Homiletical Outline of Psalm 116

Here is a preaching outline of Psalm 116. It still needs illustrations and application summaries along with intro/concl. It would also be good to determine how vv. 12-19 will fit in to the message. I propose dividing the sermon into halves with 1-11 as the first movement and 12-19 as the second and final rather than focusing only on the first part and using the later parts in the conclusion (as I probably would have done a few years ago; see I am growing as a preacher, I think).Also note that the final points have to be re-written in homiletical form (and in 2nd person maybe?). I used the first half as the foundation for a funeral message (though I did reference v. 15) and so I didn’t develop the final portion beyond an outline.

I shouldn’t have to remind my faithful readers that this isn’t a sermon until it is preached (this is to a sermon what a table of contents is to a book, it tells you the sections, but it doesn’t tell you the story).

Facing Death with Hope
Psalm 116

Text intro: This psalm is actually about offering thanks for deliverance from death (1-2), but when viewed from a NT perspective, it is fitting for any believer when thinking of their salvation.

Proposition/Big Idea: In the face of death, hope in the Lord.

I. Our Lord knows the anguish of pain and death (3-4).

      A. In the OT, death and the grave are aggressive, trying to bring souls down to them.
      B. These verses are prophetic of Christ on the cross.
      C. Christ suffered the pain and anguish of death and also knew the loss of losing someone.
      D. Our only refuge is the name of the Lord (cf. Prov. 18:10).

II. The Lord does what is right and merciful for us (5-7).

      A. The three attributes of the Lord in v. 5 all work together in harmony for our good.
      B. The psalmist identifies with the lowliest and trusts the Lord to take care of him.
      C. Our heart knows rest even here in the face of death because we trust in the Lord.

III. Christ has made the hope of resurrection is a reality (8-11).

      A. The words of v. 8 remind us that the ultimate victory is ours, not the enemy’s.
      B. The words of v. 9 remind us not only of the hope of resurrection (from our NT perspective) but of the importance of living the resurrection life in this world.
      C. Paul quotes v. 10a in 2 Cor.4:13-14 as proof of our resurrection.
      D. Though we, too may feel crushed (v. 10b) and disillusioned (v. 11), we must in that pain and confusion call out to the Lord who gives grace.

Your hope is revealed in:

1. Your praise and the testimony of your obedience (12-14).

      a. The “cup of salvation” was the drink offering and the third cup of the Passover (after which this psalm is read).
      b. It is fitting that we think of the cup of salvation in terms of the Savior’s cup of suffering because his suffering was his obedience unto death so that we might know salvation.

2. Your seeing things from God’s perspective (15).

      a. This means that the death of one of the Lord’s saints is viewed as costly by the Lord.
      b. John 10:28 And I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; neither shall anyone snatch them out of My hand.

3. Your service to him while you still have life (16-19).

      a. The service of the believer (16) is a living sacrifice unto God rendered in gratitude for his salvation.
      b. The testimony in vv. 18-19 is fitting as we are not called to praise, to serve, or to suffer alone, but in the midst of the congregation.

About Michael R. Jones

Pastor and PhD candidate writing on Stoicism and Christianity. My theologian is Athanasius. My philosopher is Kierkegaard. My composer is Bach, my music is jazz, my hobby is fly fishing, and my reading is scifi and mysteries. Oh, and I’m a Sherlock Holmes nerd. I’m even part of a Sherlock Holmes society.
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2 Responses to Homiletical Outline of Psalm 116

  1. felisa r. manginsay says:

    Thank you Pastor for this message,God will bless you more,. . .

    Felisa Manginsay

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