Mohler: Younger Pastors and the Hope of a Future

Al Mohler has some thoughts after spending time with a group of young SBC pastors. He lists eight qualities he saw in these men:
1. They are deeply committed to the Gospel and to the authority of Scripture.

2. They love the church. They have resisted the temptation to give up on the church or to be satisfied with a parachurch form of ministry.

3. They are gifted preachers and teachers. They rightly divide the Word of Truth and they make no apology for preaching the Bible. They are dedicated to expository preaching and they actually know what that means. They may not use pulpits, but they do have something important to say when they get before a congregation.

4. They are eager evangelists.

5. They are complementarians who affirm the biblical roles for men and women in both the church and the home.

6. They are men of vision. They apply intelligence and discernment to the building up of the church and the cause of the Gospel.

7. They are men of global reach and Great Commission passion. They long to see the nations exult in Christ.

8. They are men of joy. To be with them is to sense their joy and their lack of cynicism. They are not interested in complaining about the church. They are planters and fixers. They scratch their heads as they look at many denominational structures and habits, but they have not given up.
This is good news not only for the SBC, but for the Kingdom. Mohler’s concluding thoughts show insight and a reason to hope:

Most denominations now look to the younger generation and wonder if there will be any pastors, or if the younger pastors will love the Gospel, preach the Word, and commit themselves to the church and the Great Commission. Southern Baptists are now blessed to look at the rising generation of pastors and see so much that should bring satisfaction, hope, and joy. The younger you go in the Southern Baptist Convention, the more conviction you discover. There is reason for great hope.

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About Michael R. Jones

Pastor and PhD candidate writing on Paul's theology of suffering.
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