Searching for Substance: Rachel Held Evans’ Decades-Old Prescription for Reaching Millennials

I am constantly amazed at the people who claim to find profundity and wisdom in RHE’s writings. Her theological method is little more than her own likes and dislikes, she’s sometimes as hateful and mean the people she accuses of being hateful and mean, and she is, in many ways, as fundamentalist as the fundamentalists she decries, just in the opposite direction.

Uniting Grace

Webber saw this attraction 30 years ago. Webber saw this attraction 30 years ago.

Everything old is new again.  It’s painful to watch a well-worn thesis go viral 30 years late and with someone else’s name attached.  Many folks have been talking about this self-aggrandizing piece by famous I-used-to-be-evangelical-but-now-I’m-enlightened blogger Rachel Held Evans (henceforth RHE).  Aside from seeing it all over Facebook and Twitter, I have unchurched friends sending me messages about it, I see some of my denominational supervisors writing about it, and I overhear colleagues talk about it at meetings. Thus it’s hard to argue that RHE is certainly an impressive trend in the progressive Christian blogosphere.  The problem is, her prescription for bringing millennials back to the church is at least 30 years old.  Robert Webber made this case just a couple of years after I was born.  The idea for which Evans is being lauded is literally as old as the millennials she intends…

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About Michael R. Jones

Pastor and PhD candidate writing on Paul's theology of suffering.
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One Response to Searching for Substance: Rachel Held Evans’ Decades-Old Prescription for Reaching Millennials

  1. Thanks for the reblog, Michael. I fully agree that her profundity is vastly overmatched by her popularity, and she can be as nasty as those she built her platform critiquing.

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